Roasted Lemon Chicken (gluten free)

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In honor of my mom’s birthday, I made roasted lemon chicken for dinner (it’s one of my “fancy dinner” options when it comes to Kelsey-safe recipes).  The best part about roasting a chicken is that the Mr. Man and I easily get a dinner, two lunches, and a soup out of it.  I’m planning on making chicken stock from scratch a little later today.  How do you use up chicken leftovers?

Ingredients: 

  • Whole chicken (about 4 pounds)
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 large lemon
  • 2 teaspoons dried rosemary (or 4 sprigs)
  • 3 garlic cloves (peeled)
  • Olive oil (about 2 tablespoons)
  • two medium yellow onions
  • A couple potatoes, celery, and carrots (optional)

Direction: 

  1. Rinse chicken (inside and out) and remove giblets and liver, and pat dry.  Then, trim excess fat from around the cavity.  Let sit at room temperature for an hour.
  2. Preheat oven to 450.
  3. Cut the onions into 1/2 inch thick, round slices.  Lay onions in two rows in the middle of the roasting pan (the onions should all rest on the lower onion — it’ll look like onion dominoes that fell over).  Make sure the rows of onions right next to each other; place chicken on top of onions.
  4. Liberally sprinkle salt and pepper (freshly ground is nice) inside the chicken cavity.  Then, stuff garlic cloves and rosemary in the cavity, too.  Roll lemon firmly against the counter with your hand. Afterwards, use a fork to poke holes all around the lemon and then place it inside of the chicken cavity.
  5. Tie legs together with twine (optional). Rub outside of chicken with olive oil.  Sprinkle chicken with rosemary and salt and paper (optional).
  6. If you want extra veggies, cut up cleaned potatoes, celery, and carrots and put them around the chicken (you’ll want to put a little bit of olive oil on the veggies so that they don’t get to dry, and sprinkle with seasonings of your choice).
  7. Bake for 50 to 55 minutes (you’ll want the thickest part of the chicken’s thigh to be 165 degrees).
  8. Let it rest for about ten minutes before serving (this keeps all the juices from coming out, which means your chicken will be more moist).

Sausage Veggie Hash (GF & Allergen-Free)

Sausage Veggie Hash

The Mickey Mouse apron is courtesy of my in-laws who brought it back from Disney World.

The hubby and I (yep, all married now!) have been experimenting with breakfast options.  Due to my various food foes (namely gluten and dairy), breakfast is a tricky meal but hash seems to be working out quite nicely for relaxing Saturday mornings.  We’ve tried a couple different types now, which I’ll have to post later.  This one is the slightly modified version of Sausage Veggie Hash from Tammy Credicott’s cookbook The Healthy Gluten-Free Life: 200 Delicious Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free, Soy-free & Egg-Free Recipes.  Tammy likes to cook with coconut oil and, since I’m allergic, I swapped it for olive oil.  I also used red potatoes just because I liked them and it’s what we had on hand.

I like how easy this recipe is because it won’t take too long to put together in the mornings (or at any other time of the day).

Ingredients: 

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 lb. breakfast sausage (I used GF chicken sausage)
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 4 red potatoes, diced (or 2 regular potatoes)
  • 3 medium zucchinis (sliced and quartered)
  • 1 medium sized avocado

Directions:  

  1. Heat olive oil up in a skillet.  Then, add breakfast sausage and cook until it’s no longer pink.  Remove the sausage from the skillet and put it off to the side.
  2. Cook diced onions in the skillet for a minute.
  3. Add potatoes. Cook until tender and brown (you’ll want to cook it on a lower setting so that it doesn’t  burn).
  4. Add zucchini, and cook for a couple of minutes until softened.
  5. Mix the sausage in.
  6. Serve hash in a bowl with slices of avocado on top.

Goin’ to the chapel and we’re gonna get married

I’m getting married today!  Due to all the packing, moving, shopping, and other random things I hadn’t thought would eat up so much time and thought I haven’t posted for a while.  But once the Mr. Man — in a few hours he’ll be legally my Mr. Man — have had a chance to get settled and I’ve started to make a little sense of the kitchen, the blog posts will retrun!  But for now, I’m goin’ to the chapel!  Time to go put The Dress on!

Where I’ve Been This Summer

Greetings!  Well, my original summer goal of posting regularly doesn’t seem to have happened quite as planned.  This is mostly due to the fact that my laptop finally decided to keel over (it won’t even bother turning on anymore).  I had my very techy friend take a look at it last week, and it seems it’s time for a replacement.  Need to crunch some numbers before deciding if a cheap (“cheap” is a relative word, especially when talking about electronics) little blogging-writing-Pinteresting-picture-storing-music-playing machine is within the budget.

My mom’s been letting me borrow her Kindle Fire, which has been very helpful with staying up to date at least a little on what’s happening in the world.  But the whole tiny touch screen thing is getting old and I’m dying for a full keyboard again.

In other news, the Mr. Man and I are buying a house!  He says he’s making me a peanut-free bubble to keep me safe, which I think is pretty darn sweet.  The downside to the house is that because it’s a short-sale it’s going to take some time (the estimated date when it’ll finally be ours and we’ll be given the keys is mid-December, which feels pretty far off at the moment).  This will mean the wedding/elopement ceremony (it seems like immediate family constitutes more of an elopement even though I’m not running off into the night) is getting pushed back until around December or January.  We’ll be able to set a date once stuff with the house is finally done.

As far as wedding dates go, since it’s looking like getting married before Christmas likely isn’t an option, I’m personally hoping for Saturday, January 4th, 2014.  It’d be exactly four years since the day we met in Intro to Political Science, my second quarter in college.  But we’ll see what happens.

The upside to buying a house: selecting paint colors, browsing dishware, and daydreaming about having not only my own gluten-free, allergen-free kitchen but also (eventually) a garden out back.  And, of course, the fact that it really will function like a little allergen-free bubble for me.  We were a bit concerned that living in an apartment might be dangerous due to my anaphylaxis because we’d be so very close to our neighbors and would have no control over what they’d eat.  But our little three-bedroom house will be a nice bubble and the backyard will serve nicely as a peanut-buffer.  So safety from peanuts won’t be nearly as big of a concern.

It seems like the social expectation is that as the bride-to-be I’ll love planning the wedding–picking out place settings, floral arrangements, and bridesmaid dresses–but what I’m really grooving on is getting stuff ready for the house.  I don’t care what anyone says, picking out glassware and towels is pretty darn romantic romantic.  I’m not getting married because I want to host the shindig of the year or be a princess for a day; I’m getting married because I want to share my life with the Mr. Man.  We’ll share the exciting, the mundane, and everything in between together.  And this makes choosing kitchen supplies so much more fun–and, yes, even romantic–to me than all the matrimonial pomp and circumstance.

So, what have all of you been up to this summer?  Read any good books or find any new cookbooks?  Tryout a new recipe?

Lemon-Mustard Chicken (gluten & allergen free)

This recipe is based on the Lemon-Mustard Chicken recipe from the retro-pink (breast-cancer addition) Better Homes and Gardens© cookbook that’s sitting on my shelf, pages stained with brownies and pancakes.  Much like the velveteen rabbit, it’s on its way to becoming real.  This cookbook has pretty much taught me how to cook because, even though it never mentions food allergies or celiac disease even once, I’ve learned how to modify recipes and I’ve gained a best grasp of some of  technical jargon in cookbooks that used to scare me.  I’m still learning how to cook and it’s still proving to have some pretty tasty recipes between its covers; a pretty good combination.  

The original recipe calls for removing the skin (something I couldn’t bring myself to do, which meant I had to be careful not to charcoal the skin but it turned out nice and crispy). 

The original recipe also only makes just enough sauce to cover the chicken lightly but I wanted to have enough lemon-mustard mix leftover in the pan once the chicken was done to use as a sauce on my basmati rice, which tasted pretty darn good if I do say so myself.  If you’re not planning on using the drippings/lemon-mustard mixture for a sauce, just cut all of the ingredients (besides the chicken) in half.  Easy peasy.


Ingredients:
  • 2 and 1/2 to 3 pounds Chicken (drumsticks, breast halves, or thighs)
  • 5 tablespoons cooking oil
  • 2 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard
  • 2 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 3 teaspoons lemon-pepper seasoning
  • 2 teaspoon dried oregano or basil (crushed)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground red pepper

Directions:

  1. Broil chicken about 5 inches from heat on high for about 15 minutes on each side. 
  2. While the chicken is cooking, stir oil, mustard, lemon juice, lemon-pepper seasoning, oregano/basil, and ground red pepper together in a small bowl.
  3. Brush mix onto one side of the chicken.
  4. Meanwhile, lower the baking rack back to the middle of the oven and turn the oven’s temperature to 400 degrees.
  5. Bake chicken for 10 minutes.  Then, take chicken out, coat the other side with the mustard mixture, and bake chicken again for another 10 minutes.  Or until chicken is no longer pink (turn the heat down on the oven if you’re afraid the skin will burn). 
  6. Serve chicken with basmati rice, cooked veggies, or salad.  And enjoy.

Moroccan Chicken (gluten & allergen free)

As a result of being gluten-free and having more than my share of food allergies, I tend to eat a lot of chicken and rice, so finding a new way to serve it is a plus.  I’ve now made this recipe twice, and it’s a keeper!  It was even a success when I served it to several wheat-eating friends who don’t have food allergies, which seems a good sign.


Ingredients:

  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • Olive oil (a couple tablespoons; depends on how much sauce you’d like to have)
  • 1/2 a small zucchini, chopped (optional)
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 4 teaspoons Moroccan seasoning (I used the McCormick© blend, but you can also find tons of recipes for Moroccan seasoning mixes online)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoon honey (or 1.5 tablespoons Wax Orchards’ Fruit Sweet©; a sweetener made out of fruit juice that’s supposed to be diabetic friendly)
  • 1/2 cup golden raisins
  • Fresh cilantro, chopped (however much you like)

Directions:

  1. Slice chicken (both horizontally and vertically) into small strips.  Add olive oil, chicken, zucchini, and onions to pan.  Cook on a medium to high heat until the chicken is fully cooked and the vegetables are soft.
  2. Mix Moroccan seasoning, salt, and garlic powder in a small bowl.  Then, add to the chicken and stir.  If the seasoning is sticking to the bottom of the pan or there doesn’t seem to be enough sauce, add more olive oil.
  3. Stir in honey/Fruit Sweet©.  If the sauce seems too thick, add a little water.
  4. Stir in golden raisins.
  5. Top with fresh cilantro, then serve warm over rice (I recommend basmati).  And enjoy!

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How I Got Peanuted at the Doctor’s

oven-roasted-peanutsI’d been playing with my flip-flop and spacing out as I sat in the examination room yesterday waiting for my appointment to begin.  All of a sudden I was being rushed out of the examination area by the nurse—a kind, bubbly woman who knows about my anaphylactic reaction to peanuts.  It felt like a personal building evacuation: “Kelsey, we need to get you out of here now!”

One of the staff had microwaved pancakes with peanut butter, so the whole building was beginning to smell like warm peanuts (no, I’m not allergic to the smell itself).  The staff madly threw every window open to let as much fresh peanut-free air into the doctor’s office as possible as they escorted me out of the all-of-a-sudden-extremely-dangerous building.

I had to take a Benadryl (chomped down on one of the liquid pills and put it under my tongue so it took effect extra fast), and because I was rushed out of the building so quickly, that’s thankfully all I needed.  The whole event was was still scary nevertheless for everyone involved because we all knew it could end with me being lifted into an ambulance if that Benadryl didn’t do the trick—and fast!

Because I couldn’t risk going back inside the building (and the staff wouldn’t have let me risk it even if I’d wanted to), I then had to have my appointment in the parking lot.  Odd but it worked.  Although, I’ll have to go back for the examination another day.  Having to reschedule an examine is pretty minor compared with spending the rest of the day in the ER.  And thankfully I’d gotten a ride to my appointment because otherwise I would’ve had a hard time getting home due to how spacey the Benadryl makes me feel.

Peanuts make everything so much more challenging.  And dangerous.


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Gluten-Free 101: What is Gluten Anyway?

Are you feeling confused by all the “gluten-free” labels popping up on everything from cereal boxes to sandwich meat?  Do you think celiac disease is an allergy to gluten?  Are you unsure whether it’s all a big hoax or maybe just a new celebrity fad diet?  Unsure what gluten even is?  Well, my friend, this informative yet entertaining little video is just what you need!

I kind of wish he would’ve gone into a bit more detail about what it feels like to get glutened when you have celiac disease: I end up in bed for a couple of days, miss work and school, and have the worse stomach pains I’ve ever had in my life.  And it takes a good week before I can eat normally again (I have to eat super soft gentle foods) and about two weeks (sometimes closer to three) before my stomach completely stops hurting after eating or drinking (water is the worse, it hurts so much).  And all of that drama and pain can happen if I were to just pick croutons out of my salad. 

But I suppose going into all of that would’ve made for a much longer video.  Check it out.  And let me know what you think. Smile


What to know more about living gluten-free?  Check out these posts:

Peanut Anaphylaxis: The Most Frequently Asked Questions

peanut butter sandwichMost people aren’t regularly questioned about their diet, but when you live with anaphylaxis it’s just part of life.  People have a lot of questions because, unless someone has a family member or close friend who lives with anaphylaxis, the whole concept of a life-threatening allergy to some sort of food is pretty foreign.  And understandably so.  Anaphylaxis means so much more than just a limited diet—it means a limited life and a completely different style of living.

This doesn’t mean that I’m unable to have a full, satisfying life, though, but it does takes more planning and flexibility.

One thing that helps make living with anaphylaxis easier is when people take the time to understand, so I’ve compiled a list of the most common questions I’m asked:

1. Do you react to the smell of peanuts?

Nope.  Part of the general confusion about airborne anaphylaxis comes from when folks use the word “smell.”  People assume that when I say I have an airborne anaphylactic reaction it means I’m either reacting to, afraid of, or don’t like the smell of peanuts.  It really is impossible to react to just the smell itself, though, but that doesn’t mean airborne reactions to even trace amounts of the proteins in peanuts (what people are actually reacting to) aren’t real.

2. What is anaphylaxis?

Let’s look at a quick definition of anaphylaxis:

“Anaphylaxis is a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. It can occur within seconds or minutes of exposure to something you’re allergic to, such as a peanut or the venom from a bee sting.

“The flood of chemicals released by your immune system during anaphylaxis can cause you to go into shock; your blood pressure drops suddenly and your airways narrow, blocking normal breathing … Anaphylaxis requires an immediate trip to the emergency department and an injection of epinephrine [Epi-Pen].  If anaphylaxis isn’t treated right away, it can lead to unconsciousness or even death.”  From the Mayo Clinic’s website.

Basically, anaphylaxis means someone could die, not just feel discomfort, if they’re exposed to their allergen.  It’s also so extreme that it’s considered a recognized ADA disability because it impairs breathing (which is why it can cause death).

I’m allergic to a bunch of trees and flowers, cows, tomatoes, soy, dairy, and the list goes on, but none of them besides peanuts and mushrooms—even though some of them are extremely unpleasant to have reactions to and could even result in me missing work—are anaphylactic reactions.  This doesn’t mean my other reactions aren’t a big deal, it just means they’re not life-threatening or a ADA recognized disability.

A lot of times there’ll be confusion when someone is talking about an anaphylaxis reaction and using the word “allergy” because everyone imagines the person is just breaking into hives or sneezing.  It’s really unfortunate that people too often imagine sneezing when an anaphylactic reaction to something like peanuts or a bee sting is actually closer to someone eating a deadly poison—death is a very realistic concern.

3.  Are you sure it’s anaphylaxis and not a panic attack?

Well, I didn’t self-diagnose myself as having anaphylaxis.  I told several doctors and allergists what was happening when I was exposed to peanuts, and they told me I’d learned the hard way that I have an airborne anaphylactic reaction to a protein in peanuts.

Also, important to note: some of my very worst anaphylaxis reactions have happened when someone was eating something peanut-y near me and I had no idea I was near peanuts until I started to choke.  My throat begins to close up and I’ll stop breathing if immediate action isn’t taken.  I’d look around quickly while reaching for my emergency Benadryl and Epi-Pens, knowing that I was reacting to something because I couldn’t breathe.  And then I’ll spot a peanut butter cookie or PB and J near me that I hadn’t seen or even smelled previously.

This has happened countless times—on the train, in a college classroom, at the ballet (the person behind me snuck a peanut butter sandwich in, and nobody knew), standing in line at Disneyland, and all kinds of other places.  I’ll tell whoever is with me, “I’m having trouble breathing!”  And we’ll both look around while getting me to an easily-accessible location in case the paramedics have to come and, oftentimes fairly quickly, we identify some peanut product that had previously escaped our notice.

I don’t have to smell the peanuts or even be aware that they’re in the same vicinity as me to react.  And, unfortunately, I’m so sensitive to the peanut protein I’m allergic to that it doesn’t require much exposure at all to send me into anaphylactic shock.  This is why whenever I go to my regular doctor or allergist I’m given the “you-could-die-if-you-didn’t-have-your-Epi-Pen” lecture (they’re always glad to see that it’s on my person).

4. Have you experienced an anaphylactic reaction before?

Yup, I sure have.  A number of times, unfortunately.  One of the most memorable was when I was in Disneyland with my fiancé and our families in September 2012.  A woman in front of us in line for a ride opened a treat with peanuts.  My throat began to close up, I took instant Benadryl but it didn’t work.  My fiancé, Mr. M, had to give me my Epi-Pen and call 911, and we spent about 10 hours in the ER room.  It was a terrifying start to our Disneyland vacation.

Usually my reactions don’t end up with me in the ER, but every single one of them has the possibility to become that serious.  And if I didn’t immediately take Benadryl every time, my peanut reactions would always lead to the ER because unfortunately the reactions don’t just wear off if I get fresh air or go away after a while—they get worse.

5.  Can’t you just leave the room when you’re having a reaction?

There’s sometimes the misunderstanding that because I’m so extremely sensitive to peanuts it’ll act as some kind of sixth sense—alerting me to the dangers before I start to have a major reaction.  Or that if I see peanut-y products, like candies or a PB and J, that I just need to get out of the area.

Unfortunately, by the time that I see something peanut-y that’s unwrapped or start to have a reaction (my throat starts closing up), it’s too late.  I always leave the room quickly, but at that point I’m already having a reaction.

By the time I notice unwrapped peanuts in an area, I’m smack-dab in the middle of a life-threatening medical emergency.  As a result, the only way to avoid anaphylactic reactions is by not being exposed to the allergen (in my case, peanuts) in the first place.

6.  Have you tried masking?

This is a very common suggestion that people make, and something I actually talked with my doctor about a while back.  It really does seem like a great idea at first, which I completely get because I’d wondered if it’d work, too.

My doctor said that the mask itself likely wouldn’t protect me from having anaphylactic reactions.  But the trouble is that even if I had a good enough mask that it did help while I wore it, if I were exposed to peanuts while wearing a mask I’d have a reaction as soon as I took the mask off.  For example, I’ve reacted to my clothing after having been exposed to peanuts.

It’s like if someone encountered a toxic spill; wearing a mask wouldn’t help because it would be on their clothing and everywhere.  As a result, once I get home from having a major reaction I have to shower and wash my clothes to make sure the particles are completely off of everything (after I have an anaphylactic reaction I’m much, much more sensitive even than normal so it’s very important to get everything as clean and peanut-free as possible).

7. Will you outgrow it?  

Sometimes—but not always—people who have food allergies as children will outgrow their allergies as they get older.  Not something to bank on, though and, if you’re talking to the parent of a child with food allergies, don’t tell them it’ll all be a-okay in a couple of years, because there’s no way of knowing if that particular child will be one of the lucky ones.  And they likely won’t be.

That said, I don’t even have the chance of being one of the lucky kiddos to outgrow my food allergies because my peanut allergy started when I was 21 (I’m 26 now for reference).  Those of us who develop food allergies as adults are more apt (I honestly don’t know why) do be anaphylactic.  And we also don’t outgrow our food foes.   

8. Can’t you just use your Epi-Pen?

A lot of people think that as long as I have my magical Epi-Pen on me that I’ll be fine, but all Epi-Pens truly do is override the anaphylactic reaction temporarily.  If I had to use my Epi-Pen it wouldn’t fix things; it’d mean I’d have to be rushed to the ER in an ambulance before the reaction returned with full force.  Basically, it just buys me a little more time (I’ve been told about twenty minutes, but I think it’d depend on the severity of the allergy).

It’s not a solution; it just provides me with enough time to hopefully get to the ER before going unconscious or dying.

Epi-Pens even say on the directions to call 911 immediately after using.  And, believe me, paramedics take it very seriously when you tell them you just had to use your Epi-Pen.

9. Can you take medication or get allergy shots?  

There’s no magic pill that will allow me to eat or be in the same room as peanuts.  Boy, it would be nice if there was, though.  And allergies shots are for your hay-fever variety of allergies, not food-induced anaphylaxis.

10. Do you miss peanuts?

I used to adore peanuts.  I’d even made up my own peanut-butter based mythology (whoever gets to eat the swirl at the top of a freshly opened jar of peanut butter got a wish).  And the summer of 2005, right after I graduated from high school, I lived in Hungary for about four months.  A land that was virtually void of my favorite snack, so my mom mailed me a jar of creamy Skippy every month.

That was then.  Now peanuts and peanut butter are no longer a homey treat when I’m far away—they’re something I have to spend my entire life avoiding.  So even though I was extra fond of peanut butter originally, I don’t miss eating the sticky, gooey product out of the jar.  What I truly miss is the convenience of not having to live a peanut-focused life thanks to anaphylaxis.

Check out my article on how my peanut reaction truly impacts life on a daily basis: Life in a Nutshell: How Anaphylaxis Impacts My Life


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I’m Finally Last Week’s News

Flowers 2Well, the past couple of weeks have been interesting to say the least.  Decided I should probably write a quick update.

The other week, when I posted about what happened at my university as a result of my anaphylaxis reaction to peanuts, I wanted my fellow allergic neighbors in the blogging realm to know what happened regarding my issue with the university.  I felt they had a right to know.  But if I’d known things would’ve gotten so ornery online I might have sentenced that little article to remain in Word Document purgatory, forever out of sight.  But it’s too late for that now.  I even ended up in a clip on the local news, which was picked up by other news stations and even ended up playing on Good Morning America.  Yup, it’s been interesting.

What’s really surprised me throughout this whole thing though is how people have responded (thankfully, I’m not the only one, The Allergista was surprised by the lack of empathy, too).

Trouble with Trolls

The comment sections of news websites, in case you’re blissfully unaware, seem to be the natural habitat for trolls: disgruntled, aggressive, and with a bit too much time on their hands.  I swear, someone could likely post a news story about how a sweet grandson gave flowers to his dear old grandmother, and a troll—or twenty—would likely still freak out.  I’ve been staying off the news sites since all this started and that’s helped (thankfully, it’s pretty much died down now; so glad to be last week’s forgotten news).

It’s not that I expected everyone to be all warm and empathetic, but I’d honestly thought  part of why the trolls felt the freedom to be so nasty was because they assumed I’d never read their comments.  Not only did they feel safe behind their computer screens but I assumed that I must have seemed less like an actual person because of the lack of direct contact with me.  Well, that’s what I’d hoped, at least.   

Instead, the trolls who saw me during a quick blurb on their local news or Good Morning America were not content with leaving anonymous comments on the news sites.  So they tracked down my personal Facebook profile to make sure that I saw their comments.  Uh.  Creepy?  I started getting so many aggressive messages on my personal Facebook profile that I had to completely go into hiding.  After just a few days of the troll infestation, I was already starting to feel anxious whenever I’d hear the bing alerting me that there was a new mysterious message waiting—Oh, gosh, what now?

Allergies and Unicorns

A lot the trolls who stalked me down put food allergies into the same box as believing in unicorns and fairies.  And I don’t even know how many people have contacted me personally just to tell me that I’m mentally ill because allergies and anaphylaxis simply don’t exist.  Appreciate it.

Others demanded explanations about this that or the other—it usually boiled down to the fact that they either didn’t read the article or they didn’t read it very accurately and were, as a result, really not sure exactly what had happened.  But were still feeling spiteful, nevertheless.

A Myriad of Allergies

Living with food allergies can vary a lot depending on the severity of someone’s allergies, life stage, and what they’re allergic to.  As a result, some of the allergic folks who’ve contacted me don’t even fully understand my situation.  Sometimes it isn’t because they’re not trying, but because our own experiences with food allergies have been so drastically different and many of them didn’t have a lot of familiarity with such severe cases.  And other times they were just trolls with seasonal allergies (which really isn’t the same thing as anaphylaxis at all).

Other fellow allergic people, while they may be empathetic, just have completely different experiences with allergies than mine. (One young woman contacted me to tell me about how she’s allergic to weed and how she has to ask all of her classmates to please refrain from smoking during lecture; I came away feeling that my own college experience has been very conservative since, even though people smoke at school, I’ve never seen anyone light up during lecture).  ;-)

Where Things Stand Now

While I’m thankful for some of the new connections I’ve made with fellow allergics online, I’m very grateful to finally be last week’s news.  I still haven’t heard from the university at all (even though some of the news reports make it sound like they’re in contact with me).  But I’m still going to pursue things at least a little farther, only not in such a public manor.

I’ve already started looking into where I’ll transfer Fall 2014 (or maybe sooner, we’ll see), and I’ve found some good options.  But for the moment I’m going to focus on getting married, Mr. M and I buying our first house, moving, and work.  It’ll be more than enough to keep me busy.  And once I’ve had a bit of a break, I’ll hit the books again.

And now, back to your regularly scheduled programing …


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